2012/01/23

Psychoanalyzing Lucian Freud | Culture | Vanity Fair

 

Psychoanalyzing Lucian Freud | Culture | Vanity Fair.

Annonser
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2012/01/22

Putin and the Uses of History | The National Interest

“I do not need to prove anything to anyone.”

viaPutin and the Uses of History | The National Interest.

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2012/01/21

basso and brooke.

 

basso and brooke fashion design 3

Basso & Brooke are UK-based designers with a knack for making art and fashion fall in love to make beautiful babies. Recently, they launched their spring/summer collection with an interesting twist: an art collection to match, available at Saatchi Online.

basso and brooke fashion design 4

basso and brooke art collection

You know how excited I get over fashion and art in love, friends. Just genius!

LINK: BASSO & BROOKE

 

 

(Via Design For Mankind.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DesignForMankind/~3/nwDkTKFKe6E/http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DesignForMankind/~3/nwDkTKFKe6E/

 

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2012/01/21

Smarty iPad Cover

Smarty iPad Cover: ”

As a proud iPad owner, I am disappointed to say I have yet to find a cover that I really love. I’m a purist at heart (and maybe even a little picky), so I like to hold the bare iPad & feel the aluminum back & overall thinness. The Smart Stand Sleeve is probably the closest thing I’ll find to what I want. It uses an ingenious folding technique & magnets to transform the case from a soft, protecting sleeve  (that isn’t bound to the iPad) into an angled stand for working or watching videos.

Designers: Kim Jung-Sik, Cho Jae-Hong, Lim Sung-Won, Koo Bon-Young, Lee Bum-Joon & Shin Jung-Won

———-

Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Yanko Design Store – We are about more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the YD Store!
(Smarty iPad Cover was originally posted on Yanko Design)

 

 

(Via Yanko Design.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/7Bnaa01P0ks/http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/7Bnaa01P0ks/

 

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2012/01/21

tubalr

tubalr: ”


Tubalr allows you to effortlessly listen to a band’s or artist’s top YouTube videos without all the clutter YouTube brings. To get started just type a band’s or artist’s name into the search box and select only or similar. Oh, and if you’re interested in saving your favorite videos, register an account.

(via unplggd)

 

 

(Via swissmiss.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Swissmiss/~3/Cd-42L0WZzs/tubalr.htmlhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Swissmiss/~3/Cd-42L0WZzs/tubalr.html

 

2012/01/21

Funky Shoe Style

Funky Shoe Style: ”

As the name suggests Topless Shoes have no upper constrictions or bindings. It’s like sinking your foot into a warm cushy hole and expecting it to ‘walk’ with you at every step. The elastic layer called ‘muscle’ parts under the foot and encloses it in a firm yet comfortable grip. Ideal for folks who find wearing shoes a huge task, and I’d sure like to give them a try.

Topless Shoes is a 2011 red dot concept design winner.

Designers: Zhao Xiaoliang, Han Like, Liu Peng, Meng Qingbao, Ren Mingjun, Yang Xiao, Chen Xuan, Lin Lin

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Yanko Design Store – We are about more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the YD Store!
(Funky Shoe Style was originally posted on Yanko Design)

 

 

(Via Yanko Design.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/SHA505nBYLw/http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/SHA505nBYLw/

 

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2012/01/21

Modern Phototherapy for Newborns

Modern Phototherapy for Newborns: ”

The Firefly is the first low-cost phototherapy device trusted by Southeast Asian clinicians to be used for treating newborn jaundice in the same room with mothers in rural hospitals, optimizing the cycle of phototherapy and feeding for rapid and effective treatment. Its combination top & bottom phototherapy, table-top size, easily cleanable bassinet, intuitiveness, and high-tech aesthetic make it an ideal (and affordable) device for low-resource, remote settings like Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

Designer: Design that Matters

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Yanko Design
Timeless Designs – Explore wonderful concepts from around the world!
Yanko Design Store – We are about more than just concepts. See what’s hot at the YD Store!
(Modern Phototherapy for Newborns was originally posted on Yanko Design)

 

 

(Via Yanko Design.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/H1OjurMyttY/http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/yankodesign/~3/H1OjurMyttY/

 

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2012/01/21

parsnip latkes with horseradish and dill

parsnip latkes with horseradish and dill: ”

parsnip latkes with horseradish, dill

I have this affliction or maybe you could call it a fixation with latkes. And I know you’re probably thinking, potato pancakes? With shredded onion? They’re good, but are they really worth obsessing over? But you’d be using the literal definition of latkes and to me, latkes are not so much a singular recipe with a finite ingredient list but an approach to pancakes; an approach that could include anything that can be shredded and fried. And oh, when you start from this vantage point, they most certainly will.

parnsips, potato -- not pretty yet
shredded

I’ve made potato latkes, sure. Many times, even. But then I made mixed vegetable latkes with Indian spices and curry-lime yogurt. I made apple latkes, replete with a caramel sauce made from the juice you wring from the shredded apples. (I waste nothing in the kitchen. My grandmother would be so proud!) This past summer, I made zucchini fritters to solve a dinner crisis. And now, there’s this: Parsnips. Potatoes. Dill. Horseradish. Lemon juice.

ready to wring out

… Read the rest of parsnip latkes with horseradish and dill on smittenkitchen.com


© smitten kitchen 2006-2011. | permalink to parsnip latkes with horseradish and dill | 144 comments to date | see more: Appetizer, Jewish, Parsnips, Photo, Potatoes, Snack, Vegetarian

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(Via smitten kitchen.)

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/smittenkitchen/~3/yVz9VIapFtA/http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/smittenkitchen/~3/yVz9VIapFtA/

 

2012/01/21

carrot soup with miso and sesame | smitten kitchen

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carrot soup with miso and sesame | smitten kitchen: ” « scallion meatballs with soy-ginger glazeapple sharlotka » TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012 carrot soup with miso and sesame

I hadn’t meant for this soup to be so quintessentially early January — that would be, virtually fat free, dairy free, gluten free (miso dependent), vegan and the very picture of healthful do-gooding. It’s about one cube of tofu away from earning a halo or at least being surrounded by singing cherubs. In fact, if you advertised a soup to me with all of those qualities, I’d probably run in the other direction because I am a dietary heathen, and I love butter, even if overdoing it in December now requires it in moderation. For the rest of time.

In fact, the reason why I made this soup is because, in general, I don’t find carrot soups all that interesting and wanted to challenge myself to make one I’d love, and eat often. I turned to one of my favorite dressing recipes for inspiration — the ginger-carrot-miso awesomeness most of us know from sushi restaurants — and d”

 

 

(Via .)

http://smittenkitchen.com/2012/01/carrot-soup-with-miso-and-sesame/http://smittenkitchen.com/2012/01/carrot-soup-with-miso-and-sesame/

 

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2012/01/21

Real Deal Bolognese

Real Deal Bolognese: ”

Like a lot of people I know, I returned from my first trip to Italy in 1993 determined to teach myself how to cook. The eating in Florence, where Andy was “studying” art for the summer, was so revelatory that I didn’t waste a whole lot of time once the wheels touched down Stateside. On the way home from the airport, I stopped by our local bookstore and found my friend Matt behind the counter. I asked if he could recommend a good Italian cookbook that might offer even just a hint of what I had just experienced across the Atlantic. As far as I know, Matt never cooked a thing in his life, but he will forever hold a special place in my heart because he handed me The Classic Italian Cookbook, by Marcella Hazan, and, with the understatement of the decade, told me, “People seem to really like her.”

The name was familiar — Andy’s Aunt Patty had already introduced us to Marcella’s milk-braised pork loin — so I plunked down my five bucks for the mass market-y looking paperback, started flipping through it, and for almost twenty years have not stopped. That’s probably why the book, held together by masking tape, now looks like this:

It’s sort of like looking at Luca Bear, my daughter’s dingy teddy-bear lovey with the frayed bowtie that she has been sleeping with since she was 13 months. One look at him and you know that thing has been on the receiving end of some serious love.

The summer I first bought CIC, I tried out a few of the recognizable recipes — Tomato Sauce 1, Tomato Cream Sauce, Blender Pesto — making some real knucklehead comments in the margin as I went along. “Too garlicky” I wrote after adding three cloves of garlic to a tomato sauce that didn’t call for any garlic at all. Improvising with a Marcella recipe, I’ve since learned, is not something one does, unless one does not want to learn how to cook. You make the dish exactly the way she tells you to. In a nod to her shortcut-obsessed American audience, her headnotes are studded with phrases like “if you insist” and “if you are so inclined” (Fettucine with Gorgonzola Sauce: “You can try substituting domestic gorgonzola or other blue cheeses, if you are so inclined, but you will never achieve the perfectly balanced texture and flavor of this sauce with any cheese but choice Italian gorgonzola”), but the effect is the opposite of liberating. It makes you desperate to not disappoint her. (There are also many less passive instructions such as this one, under Mayonnaise: “I can’t imagine anyone with a serious interest in food using anything but homemade mayonnaise.”) The ingredients she uses in her recipes are all basic staples of any kitchen — butter, ground beef, salt, onions — which means that in order to yield the kinds of dishes that have earned her exalted status in the food world, it is absolutely imperative that you do not deviate from what’s written. For Hazan, who was trained as a biologist and went on to teach cooking classes in her New York apartment, it’s all about technique. When I do what I am told (literally leveling off two tablespoons of chopped onions), not only do I find  myself with insanely delicious dinners I’d be proud to serve to Grandmas Turano and Catrino, but I find myself a little smarter in the kitchen. Her bolognese, which you are looking at above, was the first Hazan recipe that we fell in love with for this reason. “It must be cooked in milk before the tomatoes are added,” she wrote. “This keeps the meat creamier and sweeter tasting.” And then: “It must cook at the merest simmer for a long, long time. The minimum is 3 1/2 hours; 5 is better.” We, of course, always do five.

 

Meat Sauce, Bolognese Style
From The Classic Italian Cookbook, by Marcella Hazan
We made it last week with fettucini, but Marcella — and any Italian — will tell you that tagliatelle is traditional. Because the sauce can be made ahead of time, it makes an excellent dish to serve dinner guests.

2 tablespoons chopped yellow onion
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons chopped celery
2 tablespoons chopped carrot
3/4 pound ground lean beef
salt
1 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup whole milk
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
2 cups canned whole tomatoes, chopped, with their juice

1. In a Dutch Oven or large heavy pot, add the onion with the oil and butter and saute briefly over medium heat until translucent. Add the celery and carrot and cook for 2 minutes.
2. Add the ground beef, crumbling it in the pot with a fork. Add  1 teaspoon salt, stir, and cook only until the meat has lost its red, raw color. Add the wine, turn the heat up to medium high, and cook, stirring occasionally, until all the wine has evaporated.
3. Turn the heat down to medium, add the milk and the nutmeg, and cook until the milk has evaporated. Stir frequently.
4. When the milk has evaporated, add the tomatoes and stir thoroughly. When the tomatoes have started to bubble, turn the heat down until the sauce cooks at the laziest simmer, just an occasional bubble. Cook, uncovered, for a minimum of 3 1/2 to 4 hours, stirring occasionally.

Serve with tagliatelle.

 

 

 

(Via Dinner: A Love Story.)

http://www.dinneralovestory.com/real-deal-bolognese/http://www.dinneralovestory.com/real-deal-bolognese/

 

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